Green Lake with full moon

Above: A full moon and city lights are reflected in Green Lake, a suburb of Seattle. April 13, 2014. 

The weekly photo challenge is nighttime. A perfect opportunity to share a serene scene in a Seattle suburb. 

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On the move – more road trip iPhone

I’ve been posting photos from  a recent road trip, which fits perfectly with the weekly photo challenge, “on the move.” This iteration is going to travel a large distance, between Vancouver, BC and the Oregon coast.

All the pictures show movement somehow – often other people in their daily routine dotted throughout pictures.

So here’s round three of  iPhone pictures. I also find my iPhone is very handy while on the move – small, very quick to access camera and also very quick to share. Soon I’ll be back to my posts about Europe.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Layers

Above: The silhouette of a tree creates abstract patterns as colors cascade across Green Lake in Seattle, WA.

Using layers effectively can be a powerful way to captivate an audience. The effect of taking a three-dimensional scene and rendering it two-dimensional can be greatly minimized by offering multiple layers as focal plains to create depth.

An easy trick to think about is having something in the foreground, mid ground and background. Shoot through objects like fences, window frames or tree limbs to instantly add depth. Clouds, fog and mist all help individual layers stand out from each other, and adding a reflection can quickly increase depth.

WindowSeat

The edge of a window, clouds and shoreline make for three very distinct layers.

Reflections and multiple rooms with varied lighting create a confusing set of layers.

Multiple rooms with varied lighting and window reflections create a confusing set of layers.

Foreground, mid ground and background to create layers, with complementary colors to boot!

Seattle’s Discovery Park

At 534 acres, Discovery Park, is the largest city park in Seattle. It’s home to a lighthouse, dramatic views from the top of Magnolia Bluff, a water-treatment facility and Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center.

The trails, beaches, cultural attractions and wide-array of scenery make Discovery Park a popular place for recreation.

Wedding portrait session at Discovery Park in Seattle, March 29, 20134.

Wedding portrait session at Discovery Park in Seattle, March 29, 2013.

Fellow photographers at Discovery Park's Lighthouse.

Fellow photographers at Discovery Park’s Lighthouse.

A sailboat passes behind a house where shrubs overgrow the front door.

A sailboat passes behind a house where shrubs overgrow the front door.

The view from Magnolia Bluff shows pedestrians walking the beach, with the lighthouse barely visible.

The view from Magnolia Bluff shows pedestrians walking the beach, with the lighthouse barely visible.

Can I use that picture? No. Well… I’m going to. Street photography and copyright infringement.

An issue every photographer struggles with, sharing their work with the world while protecting intellectual property, has a new high-profile case.

Humans of New York, the blog of street photographer Brandon Stanton, is a hugely popular blog featuring posed and candid images of the many unique citizens in America’s most populous city. According to The Guardian, clothing company DKNY offered Stanton $15,000 to use 300 of his photos. Feeling $50 per photo was inadequate compensation from a wealthy company Stanton requested more, which DKNY denied.

A fan of Stanton later brought to his attention that DKNY had in fact used many of his images in a window advertisement in Bangkok. Taking a very admirable path, Stanton asked DKNY donate $100,000 to his local YMCA, in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. In what was a simultaneous act-of-kindness and backhanded swipe, DKNY donated $25,000 in Stanton’s name.

So how do photographers, and artists as a whole, attempting to establish their name protect it at the same time? There’s no fool-proof way. Watermarks, finding websites that don’t allow downloading of images and small file sizes are all techniques.

Personally, I size my images small enough they wouldn’t make a decent print and hope people will at least ask if they want to use it. I have found out this isn’t an adequate approach.

The topic will only continue to brew confusion and controversy, as popular image-sharing software Instagram has recently been sued over inadequate protection of users photos.

Today I will share some of my street photography from Seattle.

© Robin Wood

Street1_small

I didn’t have much reaction time when I saw how the orange of the man’s shirt and child’s stroller complemented the orange accents on the posters.

Street3_small

Here I was simply interested in the smooth curvature of the drinking fountain and the bike-lane indicator in the street when a pedestrian came to quench his thirst. Again I had to quickly step back to get a more inclusive image before he continued on his way.

I dig his tall, white socks with black shoes.

Lake Washington, panoramic and a spider.

My parents are currently visiting my grandma on the shores of Lake Washington. Since I wasn’t able to make it down on this trip I figured I should post some pictures from last time I was in the area. Maybe they will find their way to my relatives.

Lake Washington and spider

I was only in town for a few days, but caught gorgeous fall weather, allowing me to take this picture of a large orb weaver silhouetted by the setting suns reflection.

Lake Washington panorama

I also took the opportunity to take a panorama. These are very easy to create, simply shoot multiple images, select them all in a viewing application such as Bridge, and choose photo merge. It’s amazing how good the program is at combining images. Unfortunately I didn’t overlap a few images enough and lost a few frames, so overlap significantly.